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Full Version: Are We A Hologram?
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I copied this article from New Scientist. This theory has been bandied about for decades, but it seems to me to begin to explain the physics of how 3D might actually work. In any case, its one of a really thought provoking series of articles examining our place in the universe seen through the eyes of current science.

The first 7 articles are free to read now, the final 6 will be free on August 1rst. Been a really good series so far. I'll post the link for the entire series at the end of the hologram piece.

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TAKE a look around you. The walls, the chair you're sitting in, your own body - they all seem real and solid. Yet there is a possibility that everything we see in the universe - including you and me - may be nothing more than a hologram.

It sounds preposterous, yet there is already some evidence that it may be true, and we could know for sure
within a couple of years. If it does turn out to be the case, it would turn our common-sense conception of reality inside out.

The idea has a long history, stemming from an apparent paradox posed by Stephen Hawking's work in the 1970s. He discovered that black holes slowly radiate their mass away. This Hawking radiation appears to carry no information, however, raising the question of what happens to the information that described the original star once the black hole evaporates. It is a cornerstone of physics that information cannot be destroyed.

In 1972 Jacob Bekenstein at the HebrewUniversity of Jerusalem, Israel, showed that the information content of a black hole is proportional to the two-dimensional surface area of its event horizon - the point-of-no-return for in-falling light or matter. Later, string theorists managed to show how the original star's information could be encoded in tiny lumps and bumps on the event horizon, which would then imprint it on the Hawking radiation departing the black hole.

This solved the paradox, but theoretical physicists Leonard Susskind and Gerard 't Hooft decided to
take the idea a step further: if a three-dimensional star could be encoded on a black hole's 2D event horizon, maybe the same could be true of the whole universe. The universe does, after all, have a horizon 42 billion light years away, beyond which point light would not have had time to reach us since the big bang. Susskind and 't Hooft suggested that this 2D "surface" may encode the entire 3D universe that we
experience - much like the 3D hologram that is projected from your credit card.

It sounds crazy, but we have already seen a sign that it may be true. Theoretical physicists have long
suspected that space-time is pixelated, or grainy. Since a 2D surface cannot store sufficient information to render a 3D object perfectly, these pixels would be bigger in a hologram. "Being in the [holographic] universe is like being in a 3D movie," says Craig Hogan of Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois. "On a large scale, it looks smooth and three-dimensional, but if you get close to the screen, you can tell that it is flat and pixelated."


Quantum fluctuation

Hogan recently looked at readings from an exquisitely sensitive motion-detector in Hanover, Germany, which wasbuilt to detect gravitational waves - ripples in the fabric of space-time. The GEO600 experiment has yet to find one, but in 2008 an unexpected jitter left the team scratching their heads, until Hogan suggested that it might arise from "quantum fluctuations" due to the graininess of space-time. By rights, these should be far too small to detect, so the fact that they are big enough to show up on GEO600's readings is tentative supporting evidence that the universe really is a hologram, he says.

Bekenstein is cautious: "The holographic idea is only a hypothesis, supported by some special cases."
Better evidence may come from a dedicated instrument being built at Fermilab, which Hogan expects to be up and running within a couple of years.

A positive result would challenge every assumption we have about the world we live in. It would show that
everything is a projection of something occurring on a flat surface billions of light years away from where we perceive ourselves to be. As yet we have no idea what that "something" might be, or how it could
manifest itself as a world in which we can do the school run or catch a movie at the cinema. Maybe it would make no difference to the way we live our lives, but somehow I doubt it. (Marcus Chown)

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Here is the link to the rest of the articles. Enjoy... Smile

http://www.newscientist.com/special/existence
Richard


3DMonkey

I'll surly look at this.

They sure do like to take the long way to understanding don't they? Hehehe
In the Reciprocal System, "3D" is a manifestation of only 1 component of a 3D scalar-motion. Larson called it "extension space".
But...if we are a hologram? Who is manifesting the imagery from the center of creation's Black Hole? The Creator....our Higher Self?..Higher Selves?

And does the hologram cross the barriers of density? Or is there...somewhere a master hologram / black hole that encompasses the creation of related holograms and their associated black holes that manifests the densities and othe players of those densities?

Such a rabbit hole....

Richard
Yes, we are a hologram.
Some good reading on the subject: David Bohm, an eminent physicist, wrote, The Implicate Universe, postulating the holographic theory. A much more readable book with no math in it, is Michael Talbot's, The Holographic Universe.

The idea of the holographic universe, basically, is that there is an implicate universe (unmanifested field), and an explicate universe (manifested). Quantum physics experiments have shown that observation effects the outcome (the double-slit experiment is a good example), so imagine a field of energy (like waves) and focusing thought upon it to manifest matter (like particles). (Waves and particle produce different effects.) Further, if you cut a holographic plate in half, the entire image is still on both pieces, and if you cut it again, likewise, ad infinitum. This may show that the manifestation (explicate) carries evidence of the whole (the implicate, or source).

Michael Talbot makes many great arguments for this model, and applies them to the paranormal, among other interesting things.

Unbound

A book called The Dancing Wu Li Masters by Gary Zukav is an excellent laymen's book talking about all those exact things, Diana. Awesome thread!
(07-28-2011, 09:38 PM)Azrael Wrote: [ -> ]A book called The Dancing Wu Li Masters by Gary Zukav is an excellent laymen's book talking about all those exact things, Diana. Awesome thread!
Yes. I have read that too. Been a while though Smile.
If we are holograms do we have Freewill or does a computer think for us and make all the choices for us?
(07-27-2020, 08:47 PM)Void_Marker Wrote: [ -> ]If we are holograms do we have Freewill or does a computer think for us and make all the choices for us?

Both. There are few absolutes.

At our core we are infinitely intelligent.
We are God dreaming that we are not.
(07-27-2011, 10:25 AM)Richard Wrote: [ -> ]But...if we are a hologram? Who is manifesting the imagery from the center of creation's Black Hole? The Creator....our Higher Self?..Higher Selves?

And does the hologram cross the barriers of density? Or is there...somewhere a master hologram / black hole that encompasses the creation of related holograms and their associated black holes that manifests the densities and othe players of those densities?

Such a rabbit hole....

Richard

I recommend giving this website a look at for that sort of stuff https://www.cosmic-core.org/free/science/ https://www.cosmic-core.org/