Tombs of the 3 Zoroastrian astrologers
05-11-2020, 09:52 PM,
#1
Tombs of the 3 Zoroastrian astrologers
I thought this was interesting. Who knows, but I can't help but wonder...
I have an interest in learning about where a lot of famous spiritual people are buried. Bob Marley is in a purpose-built church of his own in Jamaica for example.
more context as to why this fascinates me
https://www.bring4th.org/forums/showthread.php?tid=18227

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblical_Magi#Relics_at_Cologne

Tombs[edit]
There are several traditions on where the remains of the Magi are located, although none of the traditions is considered as an established fact or even as particularly likely by secular history. Marco Polo claimed that he was shown the three tombs of the Magi at Saveh south of Tehran in the 1270s:
In Persia is the city of Saba, from which the Three Magi set out when they went to worship Jesus Christ; and in this city they are buried, in three very large and beautiful monuments, side by side. And above them there is a square building, carefully kept. The bodies are still entire, with the hair and beard remaining.
— Marco Polo, Polo, Marco, The Book of the Million, book I, chapter 13
Paul William Roberts provides some modern-day corroboration of this possibility in his book Journey of the Magi
.[61]


The Shrine of the Three Kings in Cologne Cathedral, Germany, c. 1200.
A Shrine of the Three Kings at Cologne Cathedral, according to tradition, contains the bones of the Three Wise Men. Reputedly they were first discovered by Saint Helena on her famous pilgrimage to Palestine and the Holy Lands. She took the remains to the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople; they were later moved to Milan (some sources say by the city's bishop, Eustorgius I[62]), before being sent to their current resting place by the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I in 1164. The Milanese celebrate their part in the tradition by holding a medieval costume parade every 6 January.
A version of the detailed elaboration familiar to us is laid out by the 14th-century cleric John of Hildesheim's Historia Trium Regum ("History of the Three Kings"). In accounting for the presence in Cologne of their mummified relics, he begins with the journey of Helena, the mother of Constantine I to Jerusalem, where she recovered the True Cross and other relics:


Journey of the Magi (top) and Adoration of the Magi (side) on a Limoges champlevé chasse, c. 1200 (Musée de Cluny, Paris)
Queen Helen… began to think greatly of the bodies of these three kings, and she arrayed herself, and accompanied by many attendants, went into the Land of Ind… after she had found the bodies of Melchior, Balthazar, and Gaspar, Queen Helen put them into one chest and ornamented it with great riches, and she brought them into Constantinople... and laid them in a church that is called Saint Sophia.
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