Lobsang Rampa
08-09-2019, 10:20 AM,
#1
Lobsang Rampa
I think most seekers have read works by Lobsang Rampa but have kept quiet because he was supposedly a fraud. My father in the 70's got those books about Lobsang Rampa (& Edgar Cayce, etc.) & I think a lot of Gen X'ers and younger were introduced to metaphysics this way. The metaphysical concepts he introduced possibly gave a whole new vocabulary to young seekers who eventually awakened. There were a lot of problematic concepts like misogyny, mixed-up historical timelines, etc. but I wanted to know if there were any channeling information about him and his works in general. I know the "scientific" journalists/researchers outright declared him a fraud, but what do the circles of spiritual seekers think?
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08-09-2019, 04:34 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-09-2019, 04:35 PM by Glow.)
#2
RE: Lobsang Rampa
I’ve never heard of him.
Though other than Law of One I am pretty selective about sources I have interest in.
I mostly am guided by resonance verses wanting something taught.

Ram dass, Jon Migel Ruiz, teachers of the heart and personal transformation have been more of interest than metaphysical or new age for me.
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08-10-2019, 10:23 AM,
#3
RE: Lobsang Rampa
I have read "The Third Eye" which I found fascinating. I haven't come across any reference to his work, and wasn't aware there were any other books than that one. I'm not even sure how it came into my possession—it was an original printing I think.

As far as I recall "The Third Eye" was just an account of his memories of a past life. It seemed credible to me, but I tend not to waste energy debunking. As a recollection of a past life the story was really good. Smile
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08-10-2019, 05:08 PM,
#4
RE: Lobsang Rampa
"The Third Eye" lit a candle for me as a child. I also read his other books (my dad had a library). Not long after though, my dad told me that Rampa's credibility is in question and to treat him as a hoax. I was bewildered & saddened by the whole negative attitude when it was his material that kept my spiritual curiosity alive. I revisited the matter as an adult and felt that a lot of criticisms were from those not sincere in investigating metaphysics. I'm glad times have changed that metaphysical topics can be discussed openly but I still feel there's a reluctance to discuss Lobrang Rampa's works--aside from fan sites--in the curious/unbiased manner of a true seeker. (I know Don Elkins acknowledged him in "Secrets of the UFO.")
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08-11-2019, 11:10 AM,
#5
RE: Lobsang Rampa
Humans like to debunk. I don't think it's the point at all to prove or disprove the so-called validity of something. The idea of debunking is one-dimensional and narrow-minded. Much like the idea that there is no right or wrong—there are only cultural, societal, personal, religious, etc. paradigms that arbitrarily decide what is acceptable. I like to stay open-minded, without resistance, so information can freely flow through me; to that end I don't have "beliefs," only "working theories."

For example, I really like Carlos Castaneda's body of work. I don't care at all that he has been extensively debunked. I find enormous value in his books. On the other hand, I'm not a follower or sycophant of Carlos Castaneda. People ask if the Ra Material is real. I don't care about that; I only care that it resonates and I find value in it. 

I encourage everyone to throw off the shackles of (limited-thinking, biased, self-serving, arbitrary, manipulative…) public opinion and think, feel, discern for one's self. Just one glance at history and it will prove how valueless public opinion is. Moreover (whether or not a thing is real, besides the nonsensical nature of such a question because ultimately, what is real?), if an individual learns something form a thing, no matter what that thing is, then that thing is of value to the individual. 

This existence of 3D space and a linear construct of time is something we need to navigate effectively while here. But it doesn't have to be a prison for thought, or for those who seek higher understandings of existence.
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flofrog, hounsic, Kaaron, kristina, sunnysideup
08-11-2019, 04:32 PM,
#6
RE: Lobsang Rampa
Interesting Diana, about Casataneda. I feel very much like you, I liked his books, mostly 'Journey To Ixtlan' which really resonated with my imagination. I am not either a fan of his, and I liked less the later books but ' Journey to Ixtlan" just mesmerized me with its beauty and poetry.

I really look, same as you, at what resonates or not, and find as I get older that even though I tried and read as much as I could on buddhism, practicing it, and hinduism and metaphysics in general, few come now to the level of love that I feel for the Ra material. It is so true that as each of us is unique, we shall resonate to specific things in our own way.
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08-12-2019, 12:11 AM,
#7
RE: Lobsang Rampa
I feel like there is truth in everything. It's up to the heart of the seeker, to distinguish between parts that are self aggrandizing and those more unified.
Some have a more pure intention, that gets slightly distorted.
This doesn't mean the whole work is 'a fraud'.
It just means their filter isn't perfect.
I try to forgive this and take the work in it's entirety. I don't expect everyone to have a perfect understanding...I take what resonates n let the rest fall away n be as it may.
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08-12-2019, 11:32 AM,
#8
RE: Lobsang Rampa
(08-11-2019, 04:32 PM)flofrog Wrote:  Interesting Diana,  about Casataneda.  I feel very much like you, I liked his books, mostly 'Journey To Ixtlan' which really resonated with my imagination. I am not either a fan of his, and I liked less the later books but ' Journey to Ixtlan" just mesmerized me with its beauty and poetry.

I really look, same as you, at what resonates or not, and find as I get older that even though I tried and read as much as I could  on buddhism, practicing it,  and hinduism and metaphysics in general,  few come now to the level of love that I feel for the Ra material.  It is so true that as each of us is unique, we shall resonate to specific things in our own way.

"Journey to Ixtlan" is one of my favorites and I have probably read that one the most times. It is full of practical information and exercises that address the limiting nature of self-absorption and self-pity. I just love that book, and find its practical value very high. I agree that some of the later stuff was more obscure, but still so interesting. Smile


We all do find what we need when we need it. I think it is a case of harmonics. We are at any point tuned (or out of tune) in some complicated way like an orchestra, and we encounter another orchestra with similar instruments and pitch and cohesion, and the harmonics become a synergistic meeting. Perhaps much in the way a social memory complex is formed.
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